Grease Gun Tips

By Eddie Hatchett | Posted: Jul 20, 2012 | Views: 5531

To many in industrial management, the grease gun is viewed as the lowly tool of the lowest man on the maintenance team totem pole. They believe “greasin’” is a job anyone can do with little or no training. They fail to recognize that their “greaser” can keep the plant running profitably or shut it down based on his or her skill with the grease gun. With that in mind, here are a few grease gun tips to help keep the plant operating efficiently.

  • Color code the grease gun. Once you have determined the proper grease for the application, use the LuBest Color Code Program to color code the grease container, the fill opening or zerk, and the grease gun. This will help eliminate grease misapplications.
     
  • Keep the grease gun clean. An improperly maintained grease gun can inject dirt and other debris into the bearing you are trying to lubricate. After each use, wipe the gun with a clean cloth, use plastic wrap and a rubber band or a cap to protect the coupler, and store in a clean, covered area. This will help prevent the grease gun from collecting contaminants.
     
  • Calibrate the grease gun. In the Lubrication Equipment catalog, there are grease guns rated to deliver 1 oz. of grease in 40, 28, or 26 strokes. The Lincoln Power Luber is rated at 2.5 oz./min. The output of a particular gun will also vary from the output at which it is rated. By simply weighing the quantity of grease delivered by 10 strokes, you can determine the output of a specific grease gun. For example, you calibrate your grease gun and find 10 strokes produces 0.25 oz. of grease. Your PM schedule calls from 0.33 oz. of grease each time you lube. Therefore, it will take 13 shots of grease to properly lube the machine with your grease gun. (E-mail me for the math!)
     
  • Control the grease gun pressure. The pressure exerted by a manual grease gun is determined by the speed of the stroke. A quick stroke causes pressure to develop rapidly and causes the grease to follow the path of least resistance. Typically, that means blowing out the seals and causing the grease to flow unevenly in the bearing. A slow, steady stroke allows the grease to be uniformly distributed throughout the bearing and keeps the pressure low, thus protecting the seals.
     
  • Safety First. Pressures of only 100 PSI are capable of breaking the skin and causing a high-pressure injection injury (substances injected under the skin). Grease guns are capable of exerting up to 10,000 PSI. This high operating pressure is why grease guns accounted for 57% of all high-pressure injection injuries last year. Make sure to keep hands and other body parts away from the coupler, hoses, and threaded areas of the grease gun when it is being operated. Never try to stop a leaking hose on a grease gun with your hand. If you suspect that you have received a high-pressure injection injury (they are often painless at first), get immediate medical attention.

Grease guns are simple tools that perform an important job. With their proper and safe use, they keep industry running and profitable. I hope these tips will be helpful to you and your customers.

REMEMBER: WE RECENTLY INTRODUCED THE REPLACEMENT BATTERY FOR THE LINCOLN POWER LUBER GREASE GUN. NOW IT’S EASIER THAN EVER TO KEEP YOUR GREASE GUNS (AND THEIR EQUIPMENT) RUNNING SMOOTHLY!

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